THE RIGHT TO ENVY

by George Laver

If, over the last year or so, anybody has been monitoring political discourse, it should have come as no surprise that the Labour Party has collapsed into meltdown. From an anti-electoral onlooker’s perspective, it is over trivial matters; but to the dedicated parliamentarian, it is a cause for some concern. In particular, there are the issues surrounding supposed “entryists” and “Trotskyists” amongst the rank-and-file of pro-Corbyn Labourites. A bitter repeat of the witch hunts against members of the “militant tendency” in the 1980s, this too would be no surprise to those who had the foresight to expect it.

Whilst I am not writing this to defend Trotskyism – or even to defend entryists tactics, parliamentarianism, and so on – I am writing in defence of those who hold viewpoints that are considered outliers to the common political discourse; and in spite of the fact that left-wingers are brandished with the label of “the politics of envy,” there is a perfect justification for envy. It is not a label from which we should blush and shy away.Continue Reading

ROBOTS WON’T BUILD OUR FUTURE — WE HAVE TO DO IT OURSELVES

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by Olivia Hanks

The Labour Party’s deputy leader Tom Watson wrote in The Guardian last week about the challenges posed to society by automation. Rapid developments in artificial intelligence over the last few years have brought this issue to prominence once again, and spawned a proliferation of articles saying, effectively, “We know we said this in the 60s, but this time we mean it — robots are going to take over the world!

The fact that fears of mass unemployment caused by machines proved largely unfounded in the 19th century and again 50 years ago doesn’t mean that we should ignore this issue. Far from it — it presents us with an opportunity to rethink our entire approach to work.Continue Reading

THE 10 BIGGEST POLITICAL WINNERS OF 2015

By Chris Jarvis

2015 has been a tumultuous year for politics. From the rise of the SNP to the shock victory of the Conservatives in the General Election and from the election of Jeremy Corbyn as Leader of the Labour Party to the decimation of the Liberal Democrats, it has been a year like no other. As the year draws to a close, our Co-Editor Chris Jarvis offers analysis as to who are the 10 biggest political winners of 2015.

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BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS, DECENTRALISING CAMPAIGNS, AND ORGANISING COMMUNITIES – WHY TOM WATSON MP IS STANDING TO BE LABOUR’S DEPUTY LEADER

Whether we like it or not, the Labour Party is the largest vehicle of progressive electoral politics, not only in terms of membership and number of parliamentarians, but also in the impact it has had on our political system and society. Labour are currently debating their past, present and future through both a Leadership and a Deputy Leadership election.  We have contacted all the candidates standing in both of these elections, asking them to explain their vision for the Labour Party and the country and we will be publishing their responses over the coming weeks.

by Tom Watson, MP for West Bromwich East

The politics of organisation matter. A lot. I’m seeking the deputy leadership to do one thing: write and execute the election battle plan so that our new leader will be Prime Minister.

I’m not underestimating the scale of the task but our ambition should be to win back power in 2020. The politics of organisation are central to the existential debate that’s now taking place in the party. Our leadership candidates are setting out their vision, explaining how they will appeal to the country, and offering their analysis of what went right and wrong with our policy agenda in the campaign. I want to make sure we don’t lose sight of what went wrong with our campaigns and election organisation.Continue Reading