REVIEW: SCRATCH IT! AT THE NORWICH ARTS CENTRE

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by Lewis Martin

On Sunday 6th May I attended Scratch It! hosted by Hack Theatre at the Norwich Arts Centre. Aimed at attracting new writers and ongoing projects, the evening looks to give a platform to work that is happening in the area so it can be developed and flourish. The arts varied across the evening, ranging from comedy to drama and using different styles and formats.Continue Reading

REVIEW: 4.48 PSYCHOSIS

by Carmina Masoliver

When I saw that 4.48 Psychosis was on at The Lyric in Hammersmith, I jumped at the chance to see it. When it was first there in 2016, I wasn’t in the country, and having studied the play for my university dissertation, I am always keen to view a new interpretation of the text (all those I’ve seen thus far haven’t warranted writing about).

For those who haven’t come across the play before, it was playwright Sarah Kane’s final play before her suicide in in 1999. For this reason, and that fact the its focus is on the experience of clinical depression, some, such as Michael Billington, have considered the text a kind of “ 75-minute suicide note”. However, it contains many truths that most people would be able to relate to, whether suffering from depression or not.

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REVIEW – THE HAIR WRAP DIARIES

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by Carmina Masoliver

Piles of colourful patterned fabrics line the stage, and three women dressed in black Lycra leotards select a fabric and wrap it around their head. The fabrics are drawn across the stage as the performers’ bodies undulate in a backwards crawl, before the scene is set as a hair salon with the colours swept away in a swirl around a chair.

As the title The Hair Wrap Diaries suggests, during this Uchenna Dance production written by Bola Agaje in partnership with director and choreographer Vicki Igbokwe, we hear different stories from each performer. Yet the show is also interspersed  with dance, giving it a strong sense of poetics as the words are broken up and repeated with the movements. The stories themselves are carefully selected, offering a rainbow of different generations of black women, exploring their relationship with hair.Continue Reading

BAD FAITH

by Carmina Masoliver

I was invited to the premiere of Bad Faith, a collaborative piece by by English poet, Jemima Foxtrot, Belgian choreographer, Tara D’Arquian and Icelandic designer Fridthjofur Thorsteinsson. They worked with poetry, lighting design and dance to explore Sartre’s concept of bad faith through themes of womanhood and loss.

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REVIEW: THE AUDIT (OR ICELAND, A MODERN MYTH)

by Hannah Rose

On the 1st January 2008, a young woman called Eva walked along the promenade in Reykjavik with her grandfather. The sun barely saw the day as the rain came lashing in. It was the day that banks across the world would crash as phenomenally as the waves which battered the Icelandic coastline.

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TRUTH, SYSTEMS, GOVERNMENT AND HIERARCHIES – THE AUDIT

by Hannah Rose

It’s now ten years since the global financial crisis, the most significant economic meltdown since The Great Depression in the 1930s. What better way to mark the event than by going to see  The Audit (or Iceland, a modern myth) at Norwich Arts Centre on 21st March? Taking on the voice of a nation which spoke out against the accepted narratives succeeding the 2008 financial crash, Proto-Type theatre’s latest work speaks to the powerless about the powerful.

A medley of performance, text, animation, music and myth-busting promises shine a light on new perspectives of the systems, government and hierarchies that have shaped recent global politics. Be warned: this is theatre that will turn the truth inside out.

This is the second piece of political work by Proto-Type, following A Machine They’re Secretly Building about surveillance in our modern times. Rachel Baynton, Gillian Lees, and Andrew Westerside are multi-disciplinary artists who lead the group, and also support young artists across the globe in making and performing original works.

Come and support this movement of myth-busting and truth telling…

Featured image via NAC, by Adam York Gregory

 


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INTO THE TARDIS – CHAPEL BREAK SCHOOL’S PHILOSOPHICAL CREATIVE PROGRAMME

by Laura Potts

The TARDIS programme at Chapel Break Infant School is an exemplary example of creative education and an inspirational learning environment. For 10 years, the programme has transformed classrooms into imaginative environments for young minds to explore and develop in. TARDIS stands for ‘Thinking Arts Reflective Dialogue Imagination Studio’. The aim of its resourceful staff is to immerse the children in philosophical and creative enquiry:

‘The learning consists of the development of a range of skills, including speaking and listening, debate and discussion, a variety of thinking skills, social skills, independence of thought and action and persistence. It builds a knowledge and experience of the visual arts beyond those that can be offered within the usual classroom setting.’

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