PARASITE

by Samantha Rajasingham
Hybrid watercolour image of a traditional depiction of a monarch using biological ephemera from parasites such as parasitic worms; the sceptre is crowned by a virus representation, the face bears nine black eyes and insect-like mandibles. To the right of the image, the word PARASITE in black ink, reading vertically from top to bottom.
Image description: Hybrid watercolour image of a traditional depiction of a monarch using biological ephemera from parasites such as parasitic worms; the sceptre is crowned by a virus representation, the face bears nine black eyes and insect-like mandibles. To the right of the image, the word PARASITE in black ink, reading vertically from top to bottom.

The Norwich Radical is non-profit and run by volunteers. All funds raised help cover the maintenance costs of our website, as well as contributing towards future projects and events. Please consider making a small contribution to fund a better media future.

10 MYTHS ABOUT GENERATION PARK

by Suzanne Jones

A private company have submitted plans to build a biomass incineration plant in Norwich. This document looks at some of the myths surrounding this development.

Myth 1 – Generation Park is being built ‘for the benefit of the people of Norwich’.

Looking at the so-called ‘Community Energy Centre’ on Generation Park’s website, you might think that this is a ‘not for profit’ development. In fact, its primary purpose is to make money for its investors, mainly ‘anonymous backers’ who will benefit from £M’s of government subsidies, paid for by the taxpayer. Generation Park would receive approximately £34M in annual subsidies alone.Continue Reading

GENERATION PARK: POWER AND PROFIT

3

by Rowan Van Tromp

Plans will soon be submitted by NPH (Norwich) Limited Liability Partnership (LLP) for the controversial £370m ‘Generation Park’ development, based on the 30 acre former utilities site in the Thorpe Hamlet area of the city. The proposals include 120 low carbon homes, as well as student accommodation, an education centre, a new energy research and development centre, 11 acres of parkland, new cycle routes and the promise of job creation. All this and at no cost to the council taxpayer! Well, at least not in direct monetary terms.

The site will also be host to a straw-pellet burning energy plant that could produce electricity equivalent to powering 88,000 homes, as well providing heat on demand to surrounding businesses and homes via a district heating network, with claims of up to a 25% reduction in the city’s carbon footprint as a result.Continue Reading