FOOD (NOT SO) GLORIOUS FOOD. PART 3: WIRED TO EXCESS

by Stu Lucy

As I mill around town needlessly purchasing disposable junk to wrap in trees so I may conform to the widespread Western orgy of consumption that is Christmas (sorry), I can’t help but notice that they’re everywhere. Costa, Nero, Starbucks, Coffee #1, it seems you can’t walk more than 100 metres before passing one of the acceptable narcotic dispensaries so many of us rely on to get through the day. It’s time to close this short series of food, and now drink, related pieces with a quick overview of coffee and its long and eventful relationship with Africa.Continue Reading

HOW SHOULD WE ACKNOWLEDGE NATIONAL SINS?

by Tara Debra G

Content warning: Holocaust/genocide, slavery, white supremacy

Under the cloak of night, on the 24th of April this year, an obelisk that celebrated members of the Crescent City White League was removed in New Orleans. It was erected in 1891 to honour the group that, twenty years prior, launched a failed insurrection against the Reconstruction Louisiana state government, murdering police officers in doing so. Its plaque in 1931 read: “the national election of November 1876 recognized white supremacy in the South and gave us our state.”Continue Reading

THE SHAME OF EUROPE’S FORGOTTEN SLAVES

1

by Jonathan Lee

Kon mangel te kerel tumendar rroburen chi shoxa phenela tumen o chachimos pa tumare perintonde.
He who wants to enslave you will never tell you the truth about your forefathers.”

In the mid to late 19th century, Bucharest was a city typical of the reformist changes of the era. The influences of the Late Enlightenment and Romanticism in cultural arts were emerging in public administration, economics and politics. The growing call for egalitarianism across Europe had given birth to revolutionary movements and philosophies, out of which Marxism, Idealism and Existentialism, to name a few, began to take shape. Bucharest saw increasing civil mobility as anti-aristocratic sentiment spread, culminating in Prince Bibescu renouncing the throne. The increase of Liberalism across Europe was matched by feats of human endeavour and the creation of centres of intellectualism in the major cities of the continent.

In Bucharest, the Grand Theatre of Bucharest was constructed in 1852, a modern water supply network was put in place and the Cișmigiu public gardens were created. During the mid to late 19th century the city was transformed by gas street lighting, the creation of the University of Bucharest, a tram system and the establishment of the National Bank of Romania. The wave of modernity and reform which was sweeping the continent was becoming ever more present in the visible character of the city.

Continue Reading