THE BEATING HEART OF LABOUR

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by Natasha Senior

For the conservatives, the civil war waging within Labour is extremely fortuitous. Their borderline majority in the House of Commons was nothing to celebrate especially as they fully inherited the fractured Britain that they’d created in their last government and now the party itself is even starting to buckle under the pressure of growing Euroscepticism. Instead of capitalising on this unrest by raising up arms against them, the left-wing are too distracted by the arms they’ve raised against each other.

In the meantime the Tories have been getting away with murder. We don’t bat an eyelid as they rebrand the living wage, cut tax credits, and extend plans for fracking. This metaphorical war is starting to have very real consequences and if Labour cannot unite beyond the leadership election then without a strong opposition, these sinister policies will grow in size and intensify.Continue Reading

A NATION DIVIDED: TIME TO REBUILD THE FIGHT

by Chris Jarvis

We’re now set for five more years of Tory government. It will be vicious, it will be brutal, it will be hard. Cameron will govern without caution, without concern for electoral prospects and without hiding the ideological agenda which has driven the direction he has taken the country since 2010.

Since 2010 we have seen the decimation of the welfare state, creeping privatisation of the NHS and education, and the hollowing out of the public sector. From now on, this is only set to get worse. What has been touted by the Tories as economic prudence and getting the country in order will be accelerated. The shrinking of the state will begin in earnest.

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FUND MY VAGINA

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by Matilda Carter

So my seemingly flawless plan to game the system and get access to hormones early has completely backfired. When I first went to see my GP about transition, she informed me that it could be up to two years before I’d get an appointment with a counsellor and from there perhaps an additional two years before I’d get access to hormones. Nervous about transferring universities and wanting to begin hormone therapy before I graduated, I realised I could get my diagnosis privately and then get the hormones on the NHS. Though it was a high upfront cost, since then I’ve been managing to keep up with the costs of the bi-yearly consultations and was about ready to ask if I could get a referral from my private consultant to the NHS for SRS.

This is where the whole thing fell apart.

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