STATE MEDIA AND THE DETERIORATION OF FREE SPEECH

by Gunnar Eigener

Out of the May 5th elections the biggest story was the criticism of the coverage by the BBC and other mainstream media outlets. Particular focus of this was on BBC Question Time and the BBC Political Editor, Laura Kuenssberg. This isn’t the first time that Kuenssberg has come under fire and it probably won’t be the last. A petition was doing the rounds demanding an independent review of how biased her actions may have been but has now been taken down. Additionally, the lack of coverage over the alleged Tory fraud in the last General Election has generated a sense of distrust in the BBC, an organisation that states: ‘impartiality lies at the heart of the public service and is the core of the BBC’s commitment to its audiences’.

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ONLINE DEMOCRACY UNDER THREAT IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD

by Faizal Nor Izham

One novel I’ve always been meaning to finish is the the award-winning sci-fi classic Neuromancer by William Gibson. Since the initial publication of the counter-cultural novel in – of all years – 1984, it went on to inspire the ‘cyberpunk’ movement in the science fiction genre, as well as the ‘high-tech, low life’ type neo-noir aesthetic that often goes with it. Neuromancer has also gone on to inspire popular films such as Ghost in the Shell and The Matrix.

But what makes the novel so prominent in popular culture is that fact that it was the first to coin the term ‘cyberspace’, i.e. a ‘consensual hallucination‘ replicated artificially by millions of interconnected computer users – which in turn makes up the Internet as we know it today. The story revolves around a washed-up computer hacker hired by a mysterious employer to pull off the ultimate hack (not dissimilar from Keanu Reeves’ original role in The Matrix). This in itself can be seen as an allegory for counter-cultural movements literally taking place within this ‘Matrix’ – a term first coined by the novel way before the movie of the same name was released – a world within the world, similar to the setting of the Tron films.

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‘THE TAB’ AND ‘BISEXUALITY’: SAYING YOU’RE A JOURNALIST IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR BEING ABLE TO WRITE COHERENTLY

by Blythe Aimson

According to The Tab’s William Lloyd, I am not Cara Delevingne. Damn. I wish someone had told me sooner. No wonder DKNY aren’t returning my calls.

In all seriousness, The Tab recently published Lloyd’s article ‘Saying you’re bisexual is no substitute for being interesting’ (original article found here via donotlink). The central points of his argument are as follows: most people who identify as bisexual are lying; you must have slept with someone of the opposite sex to be ‘legitimately’ bisexual; bisexuality is a largely modern phenomenon caused by the desire to be dramatic and interesting on social media.

The first error in Lloyd’s pretty abysmal article is the assertion ‘So this is it: the gay-straight binary is collapsing’, as though gay and straight are the only two sexualities to have ever existed before social media told us otherwise. It’s true that the media has recently fixated on bisexuality as hip subversive trend, as more celebrities open up on the subject, such as his example Cara Delevingne, but this certainly doesn’t mean that bisexuality never existed before Miley Cyrus said so.Continue Reading

NORWICH FASHION WEEK 2015 – THE CITY NEVER LOOKED SO UGLY

by Adam Edwards

The start of spring brings with it one of the fixtures of Norwich’s cultural landscape. Norwich Fashion Week 2015 is now drawing to a close, and the more I reflect on it, the uglier it seems.

I’m sure I’m not alone in the reservations I have about this, or any other event that tries to promote fashion as a force for good in our communities, lives and world. That said, I’d also like to try to move the debate beyond the realms of body idealism, anti-feminism and classism that are inherent in the fashion industry, and not remotely obfuscated in provincial events such as our city’s. I want to progress the argument into the realm of the truly terrifying, into which Norwich Fashion Week readily transports us.

We’re all aware of the uncomfortable truths that tremble at the edge of thought when we consider disposable fashion, but I want those truths dragged under the light of scrutiny.

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