SARAJEVO ROSES, THE STARI MOST: A TRIP TO BOSNIA

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by Zoe Harding

MOSTAR

Nearly every building in east Mostar bears war wounds. Tumbledown ruins stud the streets like broken teeth. The imposing concrete hulk of an abandoned bank juts into the sky over midtown, surrounded by parks and covered in graffiti. The famous Old Bridge over the river Neretva is notable both for its beauty and the fact that these marks are absent. Destroyed in 1993 by Croat tanks, the Old Bridge is one of the few things in this wounded city that has been properly rebuilt.

UNESCO plaques stud Old Town, listing countries that donated money to rebuild the bridge and the surrounding areas. It was a tourist landmark before the war, and it feels like the only part of Mostar the world really cares about — certainly, there doesn’t seem to be any money to clear the minefields on the surrounding hillsides, or to treat Bosnia’s tens of thousands of post-war PTSD victims. Tourists don’t visit them, after all, so it’s not like the spirit of international co-operation applies in the way it does to the pretty scenery in Old Town.Continue Reading

A BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO RADICAL FILM — 11AM, APRIL 30TH, NORWICH ARTS CENTRE

Disclaimer: The Norwich Radical is not associated with The Norwich Radical Film Festival.

by Jack Brindelli

Film is often wrongly pigeon-holed as a passive medium — simple entertainment to be used for distraction or escapism. But throughout its history, cinema has never been ‘just entertainment’. At its best, film-making is combative, subversive and revolutionary.

Norwich is a city built on a proud Radical heritage, and the inaugural Norwich Radical Film Festival aims to build on that legacy to inspire the community to engage with ideas and movies that will shake the world. As the first of four monthly events leading to our main festival in August, we are proud to present “A Beginner’s Guide to Radical Film”, taking place on Saturday 30th April 2016 between 11:00–16:00 at the Norwich Arts Centre.Continue Reading

THE BECHDEL TEST FEST

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by Carmina Masoliver

Sunday 8th February saw the launch of The Bechdel Test Fest at Genesis Cinema in East London. The test itself emerged after Alison Bechdel published a comic strip, inspired by friend Liz Wallace, where one character has a set of rules for watching a film. The criteria for passing the test are whether the film has two named female characters who talk about something other than a man. It is widely acknowledged as an extremely low bar.

Set up 30 years ago now, it seeks to address the gender bias in works of fiction; it has been found that just around half of films pass this test. With such a low bar set, the figure should be closer to 100%. This festival, led by Corinna Antrobus, puts The Bechdel Test in the spotlight, and aims to provoke discussion on gender in the film industry. In an effect to ‘reclaim the rom-com’, the launch event featured 2014’s Obvious Child and classic The Philadelphia Story — though I couldn’t stay for this part. After the first screening there was a panel discussion, including a video statement from Chloe Angyal about a statement she made that there is “no such thing as a feminist rom-com”, arguing that this is largely because society is still sexist.

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