TODAY’S POLITICS: SPEAKING IN DIFFERENT LANGUAGES

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by Chris Jarvis 

Britain’s EU Referendum was a messy, unpleasant affair. Events that took place, the way campaigns were run, the rhetoric of certain advocates on both sides taught many lessons about the state of Britain. The referendum, and its subsequent result, have served as an amplifier for some unsettling and disturbing aspects of our politics and society – from racism and xenophobia, to the desperation and disaffection felt by people and communities across the country. All of these have had substantial coverage and comment in the press, as politicians and columnists have lined up to blame anyone and everyone – the political class, migrants, the Leave campaign, Jean Claude Juncker, Tony Blair.Continue Reading

THE DEBATE

by Jake Reynolds

In response.

This is not rightness        or righteousness
the wrongness of            your terror
let’s say we say        something terrible
say we say sing,    find        the music in
nothing or every-                thing…Continue Reading

THE SLOW DEATH OF UK’S MULTICULTURALISM?

by Faizal Nor Izham

Following the BBC Challengers’ Election Debate sans David Cameron, it appears the UK’s hotly-contested immigration issue could finally be put to rest after May 7.

In his speech, Ed Miliband proposed setting up a task force that would enforce heavier fines on firms which exploit low-paid workers and undermine the minimum wage. On the other hand, the Lib-Dems have outlined plans to boost local apprenticeships while the Tories pledged to make pension’s campaigner Ros Altmann a minister for consumer protection.

This follows a Telegraph report last month that the UK may continue to accept 300,000 more immigrants over the next five years, despite pledges by David Cameron to reduce 2014’s net migration of 298,000 to ‘tens of thousands’.

While pragmatic solutions are most welcome, the aftermath of the constant blame on immigrants would surely have taken its toll by now. When things start to get tough, they’re usually the first to be blamed. Depressed wages? Blame it on the immigrants. Rise in crime? Immigrants. Not enough housing? Again, immigrants. Yet structural problems continue to persist because enough not is being done to address them.Continue Reading