THE FATAL FLAW IN ECONOMICS FUNDING

by REFunding Economics

As the old saying goes, ‘He who pays the piper calls the tune’. This week, a coalition of economics students, academics and campaigners gathered to get inside the piper-paying process – the funding of economics research – to create an economics fit for the real world.

Continue Reading

GOING BACKWARDS – OXFORD AND THE UNIVERSITY CLASS PROBLEM

by Laura Potts

I was shocked to see in recent news that Oxford university has been accused of ‘social apartheid’ after their student intake was analysed. This story joins the long standing and highly complicated debate around the wider concept of university equality and educational fairness, revealing some worrying patterns that have begun to emerge in recent years.

Continue Reading

US ELECTIONS: WHAT WENT WRONG?

by Gunnar Eigener

The victory of Donald Trump to become the 45th President of the United States has shocked and dumbfounded many. What does it say about the state of politics when the first female major party presidential candidate – who was, by far, the most technically qualified – is defeated by a man who has never held any political office? Continue Reading

THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE IRAQ WAR

by Julian Canlas

Content warning: mentions sexual abuse, torture, Islamophobia

On 15 February 2003, the now-Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn spoke out to the largest anti-war demonstration in British political history. In front of two million people at Hyde Park, London, he exclaimed,  ‘Stop now or pay the political price!’ He was warning about the consequences of attacking Iraq.Continue Reading

WHERE ARE THE #PRAYERSFORNIGERIA?

by Cadi Cliff

On Tuesday night, landmark buildings from Germany to Dubai were lit up with the Belgian flag — a sign of solidarity after the horrific attacks in Brussels. The attacks — two bombs at the city’s main airport, and one at a metro station near the EU headquarters— have killed at least 30 individuals and injured hundreds of others. Daesh (read: the so-called Islamic State) have claimed responsibility for the attacks. It’s the most violent terrorist attack to hit Europe since the November attacks in Paris, which killed 130. But this is not the first, or even 100th, terrorist attack since Paris — though this certainly will be reported on by the Western media far more than the rest combined.

Since Paris there have been hundreds of terrorist attacks worldwide. Attacks that didn’t result in tricolour Facebook profile pictures; attacks that didn’t lead to projected flags on lumps of architecture. Their narratives are only a headline, barely breaking. The descriptions are factual, not empathetic. There is no footage of candlelight vigils played on a loop on the news outlets. The shock factor simply isn’t there for the media splash if it’s a country that gets attacked again and again and again.Continue Reading

MANUFACTURED BIAS

by Jake Fisher

If you were to ask any baby boomer what they feel about the BBC they would almost certainly tell you one thing: it ain’t what it used to be. Long gone are the Reith days of ‘to inform, educate, and entertain,’ they would say, while bemoaning the politicisation of the Corporation, and the falling quality of its programming. It shouldn’t come as any shock then that once again there’s likely to be a huge shift in the BBC’s functions and operations; in the space of two weeks two announcements have been made that almost certainly guarantee that whatever the BBC structure may be now is not what it’ll resemble in 48 months’ time.

The first came roughly a fortnight ago when it was revealed that 1,000 Beeb employees would lose their jobs as the Corporation seeks to make up a £150m shortfall in its budget. Cutting a thousand jobs will only save the BBC an estimated third of that shortfall, as opposed to, say, increasing the Licence Fee by a few pounds per licence, but since that would equate to raising taxes, we know the current government would never dream of doing that.

Continue Reading